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How They Turn Bullion into Coins Common cents Coins Cincinnati Logo and illustrated quarters

How They Turn Bullion into Coins

18 October 2018 0 comment

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Converting bullion bricks, which is gold or silver in bulk – usually in a thick bar, before it is made into coins, makes managing your gold and silver much easier. Turning bullion into coins is a fascinating process.  For this article, we will speak to converting silver bullion into silver coins.

1. The Metal is Melted. 

Scraps, bullion, and rounds are placed into a castor, a furnace called the Crucible which is heated to 2100-degrees Fahrenheit and holds 600 oz. of silver at a time. All of the pieces placed into the furnace are .999 pure silver.

3d gold bars and coins on white
Converting bullion bricks, which is gold or silver in bulk – usually in a thick bar, before it is made into coins, makes managing your gold and silver much easier.

2. The Silver is Heated, Melted and Made into Bars.

The Crucible fills the melted silver into dies.  The size of the die is determined by the size and weight of the coin.  The die cools the silver down and creates long bars for the rolling process.

3. Achieving the Desired Thickness.

The bars are rolled until the desired thickness has been achieved.  During the rolling process, the texture of the silver begins to change to be smoother and more polished.

Piles of coins stacked on a counter.
The texture of the silver begins to change to be smoother and more polished.

4. Stamped into Medallions.

Once the desired thickness is achieved, the bars are fed into a machine where medallions are punched out.  The size of the medallion varies depending on the desired outcome of the size and weight.

5. The Rounds Are Weighed for Accuracy.

After the medallions have been punched, they are individually weighed to make sure they meet the required weight standard for the size.  If they are too low, the rounds are placed in the scrap pile to be melted down again at a later time. Those which are exact or over in weight move onto the next station.

closeup of silver eagle and golden american eagle one ounce coins on black background
The press can imprint approximately 200 rounds per minute.

6. The Burnishing Machines.

The medallions are then placed into the burnishing machines where impurities are removed from the surface of the rounds. A more aggressive media is used to clean dirtier surfaces. Stainless steel beads are used to achieve a high-quality polish.

7. Stamping the design is next in the process.

The press can imprint approximately 200 rounds per minute. The pressure is determined by the material and the size of the medallion.

Different coins of shapes and sizes are stacked and laying flat on a dark surface.
Reputable mints take great care and pride in the meticulously tuning bullion into coins.

8. Final weight verification for the shipping.

Reputable mints will time stamp and verify with a signature when the order is being packaged.  A video camera with date and time signature will record the final weighing and packaging of the order in case there is a dispute at a later date.  An invoice is included in the package, and the package is ready to ship to the customer.

Reputable mints take great care and pride in the meticulously tuning bullion into coins.  They provide appropriate documentation to ensure their quality and the accuracy of the conversion.

Come to see us at Common Cents Coins and Collectibles. Our professional staff has over 50 plus years of combined experience, so we can help you identify what you have. Whether you’re looking to start a collection or sell an existing one, Common Cents Coins and Collectibles is your one stop shop for all your numismatic needs.

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